Weekend reading

1971 - Oakland, California, USA: Black Panther children in a classroom at the Intercommunal Youth Institute, the Black Panther school. (Stephen Shames/Polaris) The Children's House, The Intercommunal Youth Institute and the Oakland Community School. In 1970, in Oakland, David Hilliard created the idea for the first full time liberation day school. This school, and its attendant dormitories in Oakland and Berkeley, was simply called the Children’s House. This school concept, directed by Majeda Smith and a team of BPP members became the way in which sons and daughters of BPP members were educated. Staff and instructors were Black Panther Party members. In 1971 this school moved into a large building in Berkeley and then to the Fruitvale area of Oakland. The Children’s House was eventually renamed the Intercommunal Youth Institute (IYI). Under the leadership of Brenda Bay, the IYI served BPP families and a few nearby families in the Fruitvale area, maintaining a day school program and dormitory with 50 children, for two years. The Black Panther Party was one of the most influential responses to racism and inequality in American history. The Panthers advocated armed self-defense to counter police brutality, and initiated a program of patrolling the police with guns and law books. Their enduring legacy is their programs, like Free Breakfast for Children, which helped to inspire a national movement of community organizing for economic independence, education, nutrition, and health care. Seale believed that “no kid should be running around hungry in school,” a simple credo that lead FBI director J. Edgar Hoover to call the breakfast program, “the greatest threat to efforts by authorities to neutralize the BPP and destroy what it stands for.”

Two new photo books bring us unforgettable images of the Black Panthers 

Women’s healthcare clinic established at #NoDAPL camp

Why Donald Trump says “the” before “African Americans” and “Latinos”

Supporting Hillary while reckoning with Bill’s sexual past 

There is a conspiracy to rig the election, and Donald Trump is part of it

Women who hate Trump, but aren’t with her

Black doctor trying to help sick passenger told by flight attendant they were “looking for actual physicians”

Wednesday watch: Against the Wall

Harry Belafonte teamed up with black artists and activists for this simple and powerful video about police brutality. It features Michael B. Jordan (who also stars in an essential film on police brutality, Ryan Coogler’s Fruitvale Station), Michael K. Williams (The Wire) and more.

Organization of the month: National Network of Abortion Funds


While the Supreme Court has affirmed that Americans have a constitutional right to abortion, it doesn’t mean getting one is easy. While the ruling in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt finally struck a blow against some of the nation’s most draconian anti-abortion laws, there are still hundreds of laws on the books that make a getting an abortion more difficult, and anti-choice groups are finding new and creative ways to block access. Low income women and women of color suffer the most in the fact of these restrictions.

Whether it’s a law that requires you to go to a faraway clinic twice because there’s a mandatory waiting period, or the Hyde amendment that blocks funding for abortions for low-income women, these restrictions can make accessing reproductive healthcare prohibitively expensive. The National Network of Abortion Funds works to make sure that abortion isn’t just a right on paper. You can donate to them directly, and/or choose from their list of local abortion funds who need support in the ongoing effort to make universal abortion access a reality.

Weekend reading

Fourteen year-old David Fargnoli has "TRUMP" shaved into his hair before a campaign rally with U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Warwick, Rhode Island, U.S. April 25, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder - RTX2BKXJ
REUTERS/Brian Snyder

The precarious masculinity of 2016 voters

Ruth Bader Ginsburg shows why white feminists must do better 

Trump surrogates have started normalizing sexual assault in a terrifying way

61 insults, 39 women: Trump’s long history of misogyny

The myth of abortion regret

30 days, 30 songs: Musicians join forces against Trump as election draws near

Experiencing, trying to avoid and constantly hearing about sexual assault are exhausting for women


Donald Trump’s candidacy isn’t funny anymore. We can’t look at the news without hearing about Trump barging into dressing rooms where women are naked, groping women and even objectifying a 10-year-old girl. It’s exhausting to face an onslaught of disgusting and demoralizing stories, and to see the responses rooted in rape culture that show why Donald Trump wasn’t shut down a long time ago. Continue reading “Experiencing, trying to avoid and constantly hearing about sexual assault are exhausting for women”

Wednesday watch: Maine’s personal Trump

Republican Governor Paul LePage has been an embarrassment to my home state of Maine, spouting racist, hateful rhetoric and demonstrating a temperament reminiscent of our most embarrassing presidential candidate. Samantha Bee did an extended segment on LePage as a warning about what happens when someone like Trump takes power.

Weekend reading


Polish government performs u-turn on total abortion ban after massive protests

Study: Republican doctors more likely to discourage abortion care

President Obama signs first rape survivors’ bill of rights into law

Brown is the New White author Steve Phillips on how to build a Democratic majority that lasts

From Ava DuVernay’s “13th” to “O.J.: Made in America”: Four docs that define Black Lives Matter

The Democratic Party’s racial reckoning